Does cyclic photophosphorylation use photosystem 2?

Under certain conditions, the photoexcited electrons take an alternative path called cyclic electron flow, which uses photosystem I (P700) but not photosystem II (P680). This process produces no NADPH and no O2, but it does make ATP. This is called cyclic photophosphorylation.

Does cyclic photophosphorylation use photosystem 2?

Under certain conditions, the photoexcited electrons take an alternative path called cyclic electron flow, which uses photosystem I (P700) but not photosystem II (P680). This process produces no NADPH and no O2, but it does make ATP. This is called cyclic photophosphorylation.

Does cyclic photophosphorylation use photosystem 1?

Cyclic photophosphorylation involves the use of photosystem-I. When light is absorbed by this photosystem, the excited electron enters the electron transport chain to produce ATP.

What involved in cyclic photophosphorylation?

Cyclic photophosphorylation is performed by photosystem I only. The electron is circulated within the photosystem and the phosphorylation occurs due to the cyclic flow of electron. The excited electron does not pass on to NADP but is cycled back to the PS I complex through the electron transport chain.

What is the photosystem 1 and 2?

Photosystem I and photosystem II are the two multi-protein complexes that contain the pigments necessary to harvest photons and use light energy to catalyse the primary photosynthetic endergonic reactions producing high energy compounds.

What is cyclic and noncyclic phosphorylation?

In the cyclic photophosphorylation, only ATP is produced, whereas, in the non-cyclic photophosphorylation both NADPH and ATP are produced. In cyclic photophosphorylation, the electrons get expelled by photosystem I and they return to the system.

Where are photosystem 1 and 2 located?

the thylakoid membrane
Location. Photosystem 1: Photosystem 1 is located on the outer surface of the thylakoid membrane. Photosystem 2: Photosystem 2 is located on the inner surface of the thylakoid membrane.

What are photosystem 1 and 2 made of?

There are two types of photosystems: photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII). Both photosystems contain many pigments that help collect light energy, as well as a special pair of chlorophyll molecules found at the core (reaction center) of the photosystem.

What are cyclic and non-cyclic process?

A cyclic process consists of a series of changes which return the system back to its initial state. In non – cyclic process the series of changes involved do not return the system back to its initial state.

How are photosystems 1 and 2 connected?

In photosynthesis, two energy converting photosystems are connected, electrochemically, in series. The connecting electron carriers are oxidized by photosystem I (PS I) and reduced by photosystem II (PS II).

What is ADP and NADP go after the Calvin cycle?

NADPH serves as an electron donor. ADP and NADP+ move back from the Calvin cycle, restores in the thylakoid membrane, and participate in the light-dependent reaction. NADPH and ATP are produced mainly in the light-dependent reaction.

What is cyclic photophosphorylation?

The photophosphorylation process which results in the movement of the electrons in a cyclic manner for synthesizing ATP molecules is called cyclic photophosphorylation. In this process, plant cells just accomplish the ADP to ATP for immediate energy for the cells.

What are the two types of photophosphorylation?

Photophosphorylation is of two types: The photophosphorylation process which results in the movement of the electrons in a cyclic manner for synthesizing ATP molecules is called cyclic photophosphorylation. In this process, plant cells just accomplish the ADP to ATP for immediate energy for the cells.

Where does photophosphorylation usually occur in the human body?

This type of photophosphorylation usually occurs in the thylakoid membrane. The electron begins in a pigment complex called photosystem I in cyclic electron flow.

Does cyclic photophosphorylation produce NADPH or O2?

A proton-motive force is produced throughout this electron transport chain which pumps H+ ions across the membrane and produces a concentration gradient that can be used to power ATP synthase during chemiosmosis. This entire pathway is known as cyclic photophosphorylation. It neither produces O2 nor NADPH.