What does Suetonius say about Nero?

Suetonius described Nero as overly preoccupied with singing, once summoning more than 5,000 young men to applaud him while he performed, according to a University of Chicago translation of Suetonius’ “The Lives of the Twelve Caesars.”

What does Suetonius say about Nero?

Suetonius described Nero as overly preoccupied with singing, once summoning more than 5,000 young men to applaud him while he performed, according to a University of Chicago translation of Suetonius’ “The Lives of the Twelve Caesars.”

What does Suetonius say about Augustus?

Suetonius quotes Augustus as repeatedly cursing his enemies by saying that they should have “a wife and children like mine.” According to Suetonius, Augustus lived a modest life, with few luxuries. Augustus lived in an ordinary Roman house, ate ordinary Roman meals, and slept in an ordinary Roman bed.

Why did Suetonius write the Twelve Caesars?

Suetonius wanted to portray the lives of the Roman Emperors up to Domitian, and was rather free in his characterizations of them.

What disability did Emperor Claudius have?

Abstract. The Roman emperor Claudius suffered from a wide range of physical tics and disabilities. Many scholars have explained these symptoms by hypothesizing that Claudius suffered from cerebral palsy.

What did Suetonius do?

Suetonius, in full Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus, (born 69 CE, probably Rome [Italy]—died after 122), Roman biographer and antiquarian whose writings include De viris illustribus (“Concerning Illustrious Men”), a collection of short biographies of celebrated Roman literary figures, and De vita Caesarum (Lives of the …

How does Suetonius describe Christians?

In this passage Suetonius describes Christianity as excessive religiosity (superstitio) as do his contemporaries, Tacitus and Pliny. Historians debate whether or not the Roman government distinguished between Christians and Jews prior to Nerva’s modification of the Fiscus Judaicus in AD 96.

What did Suetonius write about Julius Caesar?

Suetonius’s work describes the lives of Rome’s first 12 leaders from Julius Caesar to Domitian – hence it is best known today as The Twelve Caesars. This is the title it bears in the paperback Penguin Classics edition, translated by Robert Graves himself in 1957, and still in print today.

Why was Suetonius important?

He was a prolific author, writing biographies of poets and orators, as well as works on topics as diverse as the games, the Roman year, bodily defects, and lives of famous courtesans. He probably began to write the Caesars when he was Hadrian’s secretary of correspondence.

What was Suetonius known for?

What was Claudius downfall?

Roman tradition is unanimous: Claudius was poisoned by Agrippina on October 13, 54 CE, though the details differ.

What were Suetonius sources?

Suetonius’ sources are authors like Cluvius Rufus, Pliny the Elder, and a collection of letters by the emperor Augustus. As far as we can see, he treats his subject matter more or less objectively. His biographies contain much gossip, but Suetonius does not ignore or misrepresent information from his sources.

What do you think about Suetonius’the Twelve Caesars?

Also, The Twelve Caesars is well-known for its lurid, gossipy content, suggesting that Suetonius was not too careful in considering the biases of his sources or the plausibility of certain stories.

How many emperors did Suetonius write about?

Finally, it should be noted that Suetonius only lived through the lives of the last five emperors he described; the first subject of The Twelve Caesars, Julius Caesar, died just under a century before he was born.

What is the last book in the Twelve Caesars?

The last book in The Twelve Caesars is “Domitian,” which covers the third and last emperor in the Flavian dynasty, Titus’s brother Domitian. Domitian was kind and charitable in his early years but grew more vicious later in life.

What happened to Titus in the 12 Caesars?

However, Titus died from an illness after a reign of only two years. The last book in The Twelve Caesars is “Domitian,” which covers the third and last emperor in the Flavian dynasty, Titus’s brother Domitian. Domitian was kind and charitable in his early years but grew more vicious later in life.