What is the meaning of commissioning pennant?

The commissioning pennant is the distinguishing mark of a commissioned Navy ship. A commissioning pennant is a long streamer in some version of the national colors of the navy that flies it.

What is the meaning of commissioning pennant?

The commissioning pennant is the distinguishing mark of a commissioned Navy ship. A commissioning pennant is a long streamer in some version of the national colors of the navy that flies it.

What is a navy commissioning pennant?

The U.S. Navy commissioning pennant is the distinguishing mark of a commissioned Navy ship. The pennant is a long streamer in the colors of the Navy. Blue at the hoist, with seven white stars and a single longitudinal stripe of red and white.

What does it mean to decommission a ship?

To decommission a ship is to terminate its career in service in the armed forces of a nation. Unlike wartime ship losses, in which a vessel lost to enemy action is said to be struck, decommissioning confers that the ship has reached the end of its usable life and is being retired from a country’s navy.

What is a military pennant?

Military Pennants honor those who go above and beyond the call of duty. We offer Commendation Pennants, Unit Citation Pennants and Service Award Pennants.

What is a ship’s pennant?

The commissioning pennant (or masthead pennant) is a pennant (also spelled “pendant”) flown from the masthead of a warship. The history of flying a commissioning pennant dates back to the days of chivalry with their trail pendants being flown from the mastheads of ships they commanded.

What does it mean to decommission military equipment?

transitive verb. [with object] 1Withdraw (something, especially weapons or military equipment) from service. ‘a decision to decommission the ice patrol ship HMS Endurance’ ‘The turbines would have a lifespan of 25 years and after that period would be decommissioned and dismantled.

What happens to the crew when a ship is decommissioned?

Weapons and ammunition aren’t stored on a decommissioned ship and are transferred to a different vessel. Supplies from the inactivated vessel are distributed as needed. The same happens with the crew, which is reassigned to other ships. This typically happens in the order of crew member duties.

What is a standard in military terms?

According to the Government Accountability Office (GAO), military specifications “describe the physical and/or operational characteristics of a product”, while military standards “detail the processes and materials to be used to make the product.” Military handbooks, on the other hand, are primarily sources of compiled …

Is a standard a flag?

A war flag, also known as a military flag, battle flag, or standard, is a variant of a national flag for use by a country’s military forces when on land. The nautical equivalent is a naval ensign.

What is a commissioning pennant on a ship?

The commissioning pennant (or masthead pennant) is a pennant (also spelled “pendant”) flown from the masthead of a warship. The history of flying a commissioning pennant dates back to the days of chivalry with their trail pendants being flown from the mastheads of ships they commanded.

What is a pennant on a ship called?

Pennant (commissioning) The commissioning pennant (or masthead pennant) is a pennant (also spelled “pendant”) flown from the masthead of a warship. The history of flying a commissioning pennant dates back to the days of chivalry with their trail pendants being flown from the mastheads of ships they commanded.

How did the pennant system work in the British Navy?

The system was used throughout the navies of the British Empire so that a ship could be transferred from one navy to another without changing its pennant number. Pennant numbers were originally allocated by individual naval stations and when a ship changed station it would be allocated a new number.

What do the pennant numbers mean in the Royal Navy?

After the Second World War, in 1948, the Royal Navy adopted a rationalised “pennant” number system where the flag superior indicated the basic type of ship as follows. “F” and “A” use two or three digits, “L” and “P” up to four. Again, pennant 13 is not used (for instance the helicopter carrier Ocean (L12) was followed by Albion (L14) ).